Museum for Communication in Frankfurt

The Communication Museum in Frankfurt is a fun place for both kids and adults. It is fairly interactive and is set in a light and airy space that is pleasant to be in. Though all the exhibit explanations are in German, it is still interesting to go and see how the history of communication developed in the world. They offer audio guides at the entrance for an extra 2 euro.

The museum is divided into sections, beginning with the history of writing or using signals to communicate, like fire or smoke. It moves on to letters and the postal system, which in Germany began in 1490. Next comes the telegraph and they have some of the telegrams from the Titanic you can read, then of course the telephone, radio, television and the internet. I liked seeing the Enigma machine and the post coaches. They also have a Deutsche Post train car and a modern sorting machine. It wasn’t until I went here that I discovered that the first television program began in Berlin in March, 1935. Who knew? There is also a section showing communication in artworks which is kind of fascinating. What’s not to like about a lobster phone? They have a lot of workshops for kids here, some are open to everyone where the kids can construct things but also private ones, as the museum seems to be quite popular for birthday parties.

The Museum is open: Tues.- Fri. from 09:00-19:00
Sat. Sun. and Holidays from 11:00-19:00
Adults – 3 €
Kids 6 – 16 – 1.50 €
Fridays are free for school classes and groups

This museum is usually packed on the “Night of the Museums” as it is a popular place to go. Also a good place to stop during the Museums Ufer Fest.

We will be happy to include this on your private tour, if Communications are one of your interests, and you would like translations of the exhibits.

I wish the website was in English, but it isn’t. You can still take a look at it though to get a bit of an idea of what the museum looks like. Hope you enjoy your visit here as much as I always do.

Communication Museum

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